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and center today. we're joined by the authors of the just. published book "the battle for america 2008," dan balz and haynes johnson. and to twormer congressmen, democrat harold ford jr. of tennessee and republican j.c. watts of oklahoma. but first the president's chief economic adviser, the director of the national economic council, dr. larry summers. welcome back to "meet the press." >> good to be with you, david. >> the good news this week is that the economy shrank in the second quarter of the year but hess than expected and as so many americans know unemployment is still a big problem. is the recession over? >> we're certainly in a very different place than we were. six months ago, the economy was in a nosedive, people were talking about the possibility of another depression, the statistics all suggested a vertical decline. none of that is the situation right now. we're certainly starting to see a turnaround, a turnaround in production that leaves most professional forecasters to expect that if you look at economic output over the next six months it's actually likely to start to increas
and harold ford jr., and authors of the new book. here it is, "the battle for america 2008." dan balz and haynes johnson. welcome to everybody. i want to get to the book and some other aspects of the president's performance. and let's start on the economy. harold ford, what's interesting is you hear dr. summers very much defending both the near-term impact and the long-term impact of this stimulus plan on the economy and talking about really the beginnings of a turnaround. >> you've got to appreciate the fervor and the passion from dr. summers. two things. one, there was a promise that this stimulus would have a bigger and faster impact. in fairness to them, this cash for clunkers program is starting to work. 30,000 projects have been funded, and it's likely more will be funded going forward. three, when you look at the 6.4% contraction in the economy at the beginning of the year, if last quarter of last year, 5% contraction, a 1% contraction this year, these are a bunch of numbers for the american people, these things are getting better. unemployment is not where we wanted, but this
't think soccer is big in america, you might want to rethink that. today more than 72,000 fans packed fedex field to watch international power house real madrid take on d.c. united. there they are. real madrid. they did not disappoint. 57th minute. no score. real on the attack. he beats josh wick to give them a 1-0. he makes a lot of money. 59th minute. d.c. united going for the equalizer. a lot of million. he scores again. real madrid would add another goal to beat d.c. united 3-0, proving why they're one of the best in the world. drama at rock creek park today for the lake mason title. a three-set thriller between defending champ juan martin and andy roddick. the two exchange ground strokes from the baseline. then roddick hits the back hand volley at the net for the winner right here. that's fire as the young kids would say nowadays. roddick wins the first set 6-3. second set. roddick with the forehand down the line. we go to a third set. here we go. third set tie breaker. roddick serving to save a championship point. he picks up the return but he says you're not returning this. the ball
for america right now. we want a civil and informative debate which is what i think we'll have this morning. i want to talk in a few minutes about three major areas of the health care debate. i want to talk about the anger, otion, fear that's out there. let me begin with you -- all of the town halls have to alter or derail the chance of reform this year? >> it's a good thing. it's drawn greater focus on the issue. president obama out there in places all over the country talking and setting the record straight. these are emotional issues. this is the noise of democracy. you ask 300 people what they should do about health care, you get a lot of good ideas. some are emotional. the bottom line is this helps a lot. >> doesn't hurt -- you really believe it doesn't hurt? >> obviously, the misinformation hurts. obviously, if you provoke fear, that hurts. but the opportunity that we have to set the record straight, to keep the focus on the issues, to recognize there are millions of people are out there who don't have health care, to recognize there are so many people out there left -- 12 million people
washington post" reports today about the long-term costs to america. >> what is the end game in afghanistan? what kind of time frame should americans expect? >> the end game in afghanistan is obviously to turn the responsibility for their security and economic prosperity and governance over to afghans as quickly as possible. we're doing that three ways. one is in march we announced comprehensive strategy that wasn't only focused on troop strength and security, although there's a certain minimum there that's required, but also the cohesion of security, economic development, and good governance and rule of law from local mayors all the way up to kabul. we've generally done pretty well over time on the security pilar. nato, the united states, and 47 sovereign countries are on the ground in afghanistan. the u.n., the nato, the european union, the world bank, all sorts of nongovernmental organizations, all the instruments are there to turn this thing in the right direction. the question is how do you get them to work for cohesively, and that's the new strategy. and if we can get that done, and w
? the question about the washington post reports today about the long-term cost to america. the obama administration spans u.s. involvement in afghanistan and military experts are claiming that they are taking on commitment that will last at least a decade and a cost that will probably eclipse that of the iraq war. what is the end game in afghanistan? what kind of time frame should americans expect? >>. >> to turn the responsibility and economic prosperity over as quickly as possible. we're doing that three ways. one is the comprehensive strategy that focuses on the troop strength and that is required and security economic development and good rule of law from local mayors all the way up to kabul. the u.n., nato, world bank, all sorts of nongovernmental organizations, all of the instruments are there to turn this thing in the right direction. the question is, how do we get them to work more co-hees civil. that's the new strategy. and if we can get that done and we will know that fairly quickly. we published the new set of metric. they are being developed in concert with the congressio
this the great debate for america right now. i think what the public also wants is a civil and informative debate, which is what i think we'll have this morning. i want to talk in a few minutes about three major areas of contention in this health care debate." first i want to talk about the anger, fear out there. senator daschle, i want to talk to you. have all of these town halls altered or derailed the chance for reform on this issue? >> i think it's been a good thing. i think it's drawn a greater focus on the issue. you have president obama talking and trying to set the record straight. these are emotional issues. this is the voice of democracy. you ask people about what to do about health care, you're going to get a lot of different ideas, some very emotional. but the bottom line, it really does help a lot. >> it hurt, doesn't hurt. you really believe it doesn't hurt. >> obviously the misinformation hurts. if you provoke fear, that hurts. the opportunity we have to keep the record straight, focus on the issue, recognize there are millions of people out there that don't have health care, to re
in america. >> there you go. "meet the press" is up next. it's a special "meet the press" dedicated ed ke kennedy. we w i'm ann curry. from all of us here at nbc news, thanks for joining us. >>> from n ns in washington this is "meet the press" with daefd gregory. >>> this sunday a special edition. remembering senator edward m. kennedy who was laid to rest yesterday evening along side his brothers at arlington national cemetery. with us to honor his remarkable life in career and public office maria shriver, first lady of california and daughter of his sister unince shriver, and kathleen kennedy townsend, the he wouldest child of his brother, robert f. kennedy. two of his closest colleagues in the senate, fellow senator from massachusetts hn kerry and chris dodd of connecticut. plus, democratic strategist bob shurum long-time political advisor to the senator who helped write his famous speech of the 1980 democratic national convention. >> the work goes on. the cause endures. the hope still lives. and the dream shall never die. >> and presidential historian doris kearns goodwin who authored
engines almost as much as we love making them. innovation today for america's tomorrow. >>> joined now by tavis smiley and joe scarborough. welcome back to "meet the press." you just heard the two senators. is there room for a compromise, joe? >> with who. this is the crazy thing about the debate. they don't need a bipartisan bill. barack obama and the democrats own washington. they have 60 senators. they control the house of representatives by 79 votes. that's what's so funny. barack obama is picking fights with fox news, with talk radio types, he needs to focus on his democratic party. that's the debate here. not between orrin hatch. they own the city. >> the issue, tavis, with his own party is whether he's sticking by the public option. it's essential. it's not what the president is saying. it's a sliver of reform. let's not get crazy. is it a backtrack? >> i think it is. a couple things. i think bipartisanship is a good thing. i don't think it ought to be done at the expense of principl principles. i don't think -- let me put it another way, if he hasn't tried to go across the aisl
of america history that you were able to drive by, and this was a week day in the middle of the day, so people obviously had to miss work, take vacation, park tir cars and wait to just watch a hearse go by, and i thought it was so generous of the peopl and so moving. it's something i think teddy would have been so thrilled bow and humbled by. >> it's interestingor the past several days we hear so much about the career, about the issues, about the passion. yet, at this memorial service you heard about the man, and you understood that public service for m was about other people, about serving people. >> well, teddy was, i think, known to the people who knew m him -- his heart was exaordinary. he was the most passionate man, and i think he worked that way because he himself knew pain, knew struggle, abandonment. he knew all of the things that pains a human being, and so when he saw other human beings in pain or where their character was questioned or they had lost, he was always the first pson to reach out, and nobody does that who hasn't felt that way themselves, and i think that was so
multicultural america ever, we have health disparities we could balance them out by the year 2000. they would still be living. 80% of the folk not insured come from families with part time and full time workers. >> this boils down, the discussion i had with the senators and here, what is the way forward. the president is facing an intensity gap. it could carry over. he's losing support among independent voters. what does he do, in the amount of time he has left to forge a compromise and succeed? >> he stops shouting at people in the cheap seats and brings the players into the white house. he talks to claire mccaskill. what do you need. brings in evan bayh. i know indiana is different than lags year. what do you need. what can you agree with. he brings in nancy pelosi, henry waxman and does what leaders do, bring them together. >> the bottom line is, dr. king took drugs we're not going to reform health care. my grand dad said, if you are going to stand, stand. if you're going to sit, sit. don't wobble. the president is wobbling on this. >> i'm going to make that the last word. thank you both v
illness hits in the most multiracial, multiethnic america ever, that we still have health disparities. by the year 2000, 80,000 folk will still be living. 80% of the folk that are not insured have families that have part-time and full-time workers, this system is broken. >> this boils down, i think the discussion i had with the senators and here. what's the way forward? the president is facing an intensity gap that could carry over into the midterm election. he's losing support among independent voters. joe scarborough, what does he do in the amount of time he has left to forge a compromise and to succeed here? >> he stops shouting at people in the cheap seats and he brings the players into the white house. he talks to clair mccaskill. what do you need? he goes lbj. what do you need? he brings in evan bayh. evan,ian indiana a lot different this year than it was last year, what do you need? and he brings on the other side, nancy pelosi, henry waxman, and he does what leaders do. >> he's got to get more people involved. >> he brings people together. >> the bottom line is that dr. king w
was superb as a statistician, tacticiana. he had an uncanny ability for the ebb and flow in america and a movement of the senate. there is a life in the senate. teddy understood it. so he really knew how to approach his colleagues and knew when the moment was right. i can remember so many times that they say we're going to do this and are you sure? trach your head. is this going to work? you have a sense of how to do it, how to put people in the right place at the right time. he always had an ability to attract superb staff, and we are all of us in the senate dependent on the abilities of our staff. staffs, plural. ted just could get the most out of people. he was always thinking not where where we were, but about where he wanted to wind out and how we were going to get there. it wasn't dissimilar to preparing for the race and to the lessons he taught as kids. >> there were a couple of pictures of you, you and senator kennedy back in 1971. you had come back from vietnam, you and other veterans were protesting on the mall, and he came to meet with you, and you said that was an import
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)